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To help you understand the latest golf technology
here is a summary of the meaning
of the most important terms.

Click on the first letter of the word
you are searching for :

A B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O

P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

Angle of Attack
The angle at which the clubhead descends toward the golf ball on the downswing.
A steep angle of attack would come from a fairly upright swing, while a shallow angle of attack would come from a flatter swing plane.

Backspin
The backward rotation of the golfball that causes it to climb upwards due to differences in air pressure around the ball. Backspin also helps the golf ball maintain a straighter ball flight and reduces the distance the ball rolls after landing.

Backweight
Any weight attached to the back of the head of a golf club.
A backweight serves to redistribute weight to the rear of a clubhead.
In a driver, backweighting influences the center of gravity, lowering it and moving it back from the face, which can help those golfers who have trouble getting the ball airborne.
In a putter, a backweight is most often employed to increase moment of inertia, or a clubhead's resistance to twisting.
This can help those who have trouble hitting their putts in the center of the putter face.
Clubs made to appeal to mid- and high-handicappers often feature backweighting properties.

Bi-metal
The use of 2 metals in a club head or shaft to produce different weighting or feel characteristics.

Blades
Also known as musclebacks, blades are a type of iron that has a full, smooth back (as opposed to a cavity back) and a thin topline - hence the monicker (the topline is what you see as you are standing at address looking down at the top of the iron). The weighting of blades is concentrated behind the center of the clubface, resulting in a smaller sweet spot. Blades are usually forged and are preferred by better players because they allow for better working of the ball.
The term can also refer to a type of putter that is heel-weighted, heel-shafted and features just a thin clubface without any flange.

Blade length
The dimension measured from the extreme end of the toe of the clubhead to the radiused heel.

Blocked Shot
A blocked shot occurs when the clubface impacts the ball with an open clubface
(aligned to the right of the target for a right-handed golfer).

Bore-Through
When the shaft goes into the clubhead and penetrates to the sole of the club,
it is said to be "bore-through." Clubs with this feature may be said to have "bore-through heads" or "bore-through shafts" or a "bore-through hosel."
Clubs with the bore-through feature cannot have their lie adjusted.

Bounce
The curve on the sole of an iron : or the angle that is formed between the leading edge of the golf club and the lowest part of the sole.
Clubs with high bounce angles tend not to dig into the turf, while clubs with low bounce angles tend to dig into the turf.
While bounce angles for irons (3-9) are designed for optimal performance and should not be altered for the average golfer, different bounce angles may be especially beneficial in wedges, depending on the type of course(s) the golfer plays.
If you play courses with soft, fluffy sand, you'll need more bounce.
If the courses you play have harder sand, you'll need less bounce. Playing from fairway - less bounce.
The type of swing can influence the amount of bounce needed, too. Players who swing their wedges steeply into impact need more bounce. Players who sweep through and undercut need less bounce.

Bulge
Metal woods are designed with what are called "roll" and "bulge" on the face.
Looking down on a clubhead, notice there is a curve, or radius, on the face from the toe to the heel.
This is call "bulge". Bulge helps reduce gear effect which is exacerbated because the center of gravity is farther away from the face than on an iron. There is also a curve, or radius, from the top of the face (by the crown) to the bottom of the face (by the sole).
This is called "roll". Too much roll will make the ball go higher on above center hits, and lower on below center hits.

Butt & Tip of Shaft
The butt is the end where the grip goes, the tip is the skinny end where the clubhead goes.

Butt end
The grip end of a golf club, standard dimension is .580 or .600 inches.

CC
The abbreviation "cc" stands for "cubic centimeters." In golf, it is used to denote the volume of a clubhead. For example, a driver might have a 400cc clubhead; that is, a clubhead whose volume is 400 cubic centimeters. The greater the number, the larger the clubhead.
In general, the greater the volume of the clubhead, the larger the sweetspot will be.
And often, a greater volume indicates a deeper center of gravity.

Camber
The radius or rounding of the sole of a wood or iron to minimize digging of the clubhead into the turf.

Cambered Sole
A rounding of the sole of the club to reduce drag.
A four-way cambered sole is one that is rounded at every edge of a wood.
For example : the 5-wood had a cambered sole to help it slide through the deep rough.

Cast
Steel is melted and poured into a mould (the "cast"). When cool, the cast is removed and the head is polished. See also Forged.

Cavity Back
An iron on which the clubhead features a thin face with a hollowed-out area on back,
distributing the weight around the perimeter (contrast with "blade" or "muscleback")
The weighting of cavity back clubs allows for a much larger sweet spot, which provides help on mis-hits.
Cavity back irons are preferred by mid- to high-handicap players and players who need help with accuracy. Cavity backs fall into the category of "game improvement clubs."

Center of Gravity (CG, COG)
Also called the "center of mass", it is the point within the head of a golf club at which it would be perfectly balanced.
Clubmakers usually attempt to get the center of gravity, particularly on drivers, as low to the ground as possible because a low center of gravity helps get the ball airborne.
Players whose ball flights are too high should look for a higher center of gravity, which will lower the trajectory.
Some golfers think by putting lead tape on their club heads they are lowering the center of gravity... You will change the swing weight, but in order to lower the center of gravity on your 5 iron 1/64" you would have to apply 15 one inch pieces of lead tape. The 5 iron would be unplayable...

Cleek
A fairway wood with the approximate loft of a 4-wood that produces high shots that land softly.

Club Length
Off the rack golf clubs are made to standard lengths for men and women.
The length is dependent on many factors: height, arm length, ball striking ability, strength, etc. Longer lengths have become more popular to generate more clubhead speed to hit the ball further. But if you can't control the club, the only benefit from additional length are the long walks you'll take looking for your ball in the woods.

Club Weight
How many ounces does the total club weigh ? But total club weight does not determine swing weight. What matters are the weight of the parts (head, shaft, grip) and the length of the club. These determine swing weight. More weight in the head, with less in the shaft and grip yields a higher swing weight (the heavier the head feels during the "swing"). The longer a club, the higher the swing weight, and vice versa. Try adding lead tape to your driver head, then take it off and add it to the grip and feel the difference in swing weight. The same is true swinging a 50" driver versus a 42" driver, there is a big difference in feel or swing weight.
With the varying weights of shafts (45 to 139 grams), grips and lengths, swing weight has become more complex.

Clubhead Volume
Everyone wants to know the volume of their woods, particularly those into the "bigger is better" thinking. For club heads, volume is measured in cubic centimeters - CC.

Clubhead Weight
Club heads are produced to specific weights measured in grams, at least the quality heads are. This is because head weight is a factor in determining swing weight.
The size of the clubhead does not reflect its weight.
A five wood head weighs more than a driver, yet its overall size is smaller.
Most golfers are not aware that all 5 irons weigh the same, all 6 irons weigh the same and so on... The difference they feel between , lets say different 5 irons, is the "total weight" which is caused by the different shaft weights, not the head weight.

Coefficient of Restitution - COR
A measurement of the clubface's ability to rebound the ball, expressed as a percentage that is determined by a ball's speed off the clubhead divided by the speed at which it struck the clubhead.
The term came into the popular lexicon as ultra-thin-faced drivers began to proliferate.
An effect of the thin faces is known as the "spring-like effect" or "trampoline effect":
the face of the driver depresses as the ball is struck, then rebounds - providing a little extra oomph to the shot. A driver that exhibits this property will have a very high COR.
The maximum COR allowed under USGA rules is .830.

Note: Not interchangeable with "spring-like effect."
COR is a measurement; spring-like effect is what's being measured.

Combination Shafts
These are parallel tip that can be trimmed from the tip to make one of two flexes.
For example, tip trim 2" to make a stiff 5 iron, or tip trim 1" to make a regular flex 5 iron.

Counterbalancing
Reducing a golf club's swingweight by adding weight to the grip end.

Countersunk Hosel
Countersunk, coned, or chambered all mean the same thing :
material removed from the inside top of the hosel so they can be used with graphite shafts.
Otherwise, the sharp hosel edge can cut into a graphite shaft layers, causing the shaft to break and your club head to fly away.

Crown
The top of a wood's head.

Deep-Faced Driver
A driver with greater-than-standard height on its face.

Divot
The mark left on the ground after turf is uprooted by the golf club during the swing.
Divots can reveal the position of the clubhead at impact and the path of the golfers swing.
A divot that is deeper in the toe, for example, indicates that the toe of the club is entering
the turf before the heel. This may cause the clubface to open at impact, causing the ball to start out to the right of the target for a right-handed golfer.

Draw
A ball flight with a slight right-to-left curve for right-handed golfers, and a slight left-to-right curve for left-handed golfers.

Face Angle
The angle of the face of the clubhead relative to the target.
If the clubhead is "square," the clubface will be directly facing the target on address.
If it it "closed," it will be aligned to the left of the target.
If it is "open," it will be aligned to the right of the target (for right-handed players).
It is not unusual for game-improvement clubs (those marketed to higher handicappers),
particularly drivers, to have a face angle several degrees closed in order to fight slices.

Usually described as being open or closed, face angle refers to the direction that the wood club face is designed to point toward when the shaft is in the proper position at address.
A right-handed club with a 2° open face angle points 2° to the right of the intended target line. The purpose of face angle is to encourage ball flight toward the intended direction
(a golfer with an uncontrolled draw or hook can reduce this tendency with an open face angle).
Face angle and loft are directly related, and if the club in this example is aligned square to the target, the loft would be reduced by about 1 ½°.

Face-Balanced
A face-balanced putter is one with a design that causes the face to remain parallel with the ground when the club is balanced at it's center of gravity.
To find out if a putter is face-balanced, balance the putter on your finger by holding the putter horizontally and placing your finger under the shaft about 10 inches from the putter head.
Once you can balance the putter, check to see if the face is pointing directly upward.
If it is, the putter is face-balanced. Generally, a face-balanced putter will perform better
for golfers with a straighter putting stroke or golfers who tend to push their putts. Face balancing helps avoid a unwanted twisting effect when you strike the ball.

Face progression
Measurement of the distance from the centerline of the shaft or hosel to the front leading edge of the clubface.

Fade
A ball flight with a slight left-to-right curve for right-handed players, and a slight right-to-left curve for left-handed players.

Ferrule
The plastic ring or cover over the hosel at the point where the shaft enters the clubhead.
These are mainly cosmetic, but do add some stability to graphite shafts preventing breakage.

Flange
A flange is a part of a clubhead that juts out from the rear.
Think of many heel-toe balanced putters: The part that goes back from the face - the thin strip of metal that sits along the ground - is the flange.
The term is commonly used in discussions of putters and sand wedges.

Flat
A lie angle in which the shaft extends from the hosel at a lower angle than a person of average height and with average arm length. A flat lie angle might be recommended for shorter players and players with low hand positions at impact.
Can also describe a club whose 'toe' is lower than the 'heel' when used by a particular golfer.
While this may not be the ideal club position at impact, it can have a positive effect for golfers
who have an undesirable tendency to draw or hook the ball.

Flex
A measurement of how much a shaft will bend under a certain load.
Shafts with more flex generally feel softer and can help golfers with slower swing speeds hit shots with optimal trajectory.
Stiffer shafts generally feel firmer at impact and produce lower trajectories.
Flex is usually measured on a deflection board, where the butt of the shaft is secured horizontally and a weight (usually 4lbs.) is placed on the tip. The distance the tip bends downward is measured in inches.

Forged
Forging means that the clubhead is made from a single solid piece of steel that is heated and cooled into the correct shape, instead of being cast in a preformed mould. Often a forged iron will give you more "feel".

Forgiveness
How kind the club is to you when you hit it off-centre ...

Frequency Matching
The process of ensuring that the shaft vibrations of all clubs in a given set match in frequency when struck, so that the feel is the same for each club. Clubs are rated for frequency by a special machine that records the oscillations of a shaft after its tip is pulled down and released, causing it to vibrate.

Gear Effect
When you hit a ball on the toe of the face, you usually feel it.
That's because the clubhead is trying to rotate clockwise around its center of gravity,
which is towards the center of the clubhead, as the ball strikes the toe.
Now imagine the club face and ball having teeth like gears in a clock.
As the club face moves clockwise, the ball will move (spin) counterclockwise, imparting a hooking effect on the ball. This is known as the gear effect.
There is little gear effect on irons where the center of gravity is close to the face.
But on woods, where the center of gravity is further away from the face toward the rear,
gear effect can be a factor. Club designers try to counteract the gear effect by designing a radiused face (known as "bulge") on woods. That's why wood faces have a curved look to them at address, while irons are horizontal or straight.

Graphite
A pure carbon mineral made into fibres, mixed with resin and epoxy and formed into a golf shaft. Very light weight and high strength.

Grind
Grind is what you do to your clubheads to alter them to your own personal preferences. Literally grinding the metal on the sole or the clubhead... Find a pro and ask him to do it for you, if you really need to. Unless you're a Tour player, you probably don't ...

Grip
The part of the golf club where the hands are placed.
Also used to refer to the player's personal preference, or method, for holding the golf club.
Grip size is an important fitting variable. Too small a grip can cause a player to draw or hook the ball, while too large a grip can cause a player to fade or slice the ball.

Grip Cores
The core of a grip is the big cavity that the shaft goes into.
Every grip has a core size expressed in inches. So a .600 grip has a core of .600 inches.
If the butt diameter of the shaft you are gripping is the same size, then the end result will be a "standard size grip".
If you put a .600 grip on a .580 shaft, the grip will be under sized by about 1/64".
If you put a .580 grip on a .600 shaft, the grip will be over sized by about 1/64".
Grip size is critical.

Grips: Ribbed & Round
Most grips come in two styles, round and ribbed. A ribbed grip would be more appropriately called a "spine" grip, because like your spine, it runs from the top of the grip to the bottom.
On a ribbed grip, you will feel a ridge, or rib, or spine, running along the under side of the grip
as you grip the club. This is supposed to assist in clubhead alignment, or make sure you do not address the ball with the club upside down !
A round grip has no rib.

Groove
The horizontal scoring lines on the face of the club that help impart spin on the ball.

Heel
The area of the clubhead that is closest to the hosel, which is where the shaft is connected to the clubhead. A shot hit off the heel is said to be heeled.

Heel and Toe
Weighted A club design where weight is distributed towards the heel and toe of a club, usually an iron, to reduce the effect of mis-hits.

Hook (or neck)
A ball flight with a pronounced right-to-left curve for right-handed golfers,
and a pronounced left-to-right curve for left-handed golfers.

Hosel
The part of the club connecting the shaft to the clubhead.
The standard diameter of an iron hosel is .370 inches, while the standard diameter of a wood hosel is .335 inches.

Hosel Progression/ Offset
The distance that the centerline of the shaft is ahead of, or behind, the leading edge of the golf club. This design feature encourages a player's hands to stay ahead of the ball at impact,
which allows the face of the golf club to return square to the target more easily, reducing a fade or slice (or, encouraging a draw).

Hosel Bore Types
Three different hosel bores are available:
1 Standard Bore. Usually in metal heads, the depth of the hosel is between 1 1/4 - 2 inches deep. This is the depth the shaft fits into the hosel.
2 Thru Bore. This is when the hosel hole goes all the way through the sole of the club head.
Calloways are renowned for this.
3 Blind Bore. Wooden heads and some composit heads have a hosel bores that exstent to within 1/4 inch of the sole plate, but do not go completely through. This hosel bore depth is usually around 4 inches.
It should be noted that the amout of tipping for the same shaft and flex will be different for each of these different types of bores.

Impact board
Dynamic fitting tool used to determine the part of the club sole that strikes the board at impact. White tape is applied to the sole of the club to show the impact point.

Kick Point / Shaft Flex Point / Bend point
Kickpoint, also called flex point or bend point, is the point along a shaft's length at which it exhibits the greatest amount of bend when the tip is pulled down. Ball flight is affected by the location of the kickpoint, although to what extent is a subject of some contention. A general consensus is beginning to emerge that kickpoint has only a very modest effect on ball flight. It has more to do with feel than trajectory.
A high kickpoint may help lower the trajectory of most golfer's shots;
a low kickpoint may result in a slightly higher trajectory for most golfers.

Leading Edge
The frontmost edge of the sole of a golf club. Literally, the edge of the club that leads in a swing.

Length
The dimension measure from the heel of the clubhead to the butt end of the grip while in the playing position, measured in inches or centimeters.

Lie
It is a measurement of how the clubhead "lies" on the ground from toe to heel.
The measurement is taken by determining the angle in degrees between (a) the centerline of the shaft, and (b) the ground with the clubhead resting on its center.
Stand at address with a club, and stand looking at the club face such that he would hit you with it.
If the toe is raised up in the air, more so than the heel, the lie needs to be adjusted to a more "flat" lie.
If the toe is touching the ground, it needs to be adjusted to a more "upright" lie.
Lie is affected by how you hold the club as much as height. Unless there is a dramatic "toe up" or "toe down" look, you don't need to worry too much about lie.

Lie Angle
The angle formed between the centerline of the shaft and the sole of the club.
With metal woods, the lie angle is combined with the face angle to create a hosel position
that can help a golfer reduce or eliminate a slice or a hook.

Loft
The angle formed between the centerline of the shaft and the clubface. Technically, iron loft and wood loft are measured slightly differently, but the effective result is the same.
Loft gives you an idea of how far and how high the ball will go in the lauch trajectory.
Drivers are the least-lofted clubs (not counting putters), while wedges are the most-lofted.
Driver lofts for most players run between 7.5 and 12.5 degrees.
Clubs increase in loft through the set until reaching the lob wedge, which is usually lofted around 60 degrees. Each one has slightly different lofts to optimize spin and lift.

Long Irons
The 1-4 irons.

Low Profile
Clubheads with shallow faces - lowers the centre of gravity. Popular in fairway woods.

Maraging steel
Stainless steel with unique ingredients and heat treating methods that produces harder steel.

Middle or Mid-irons
The 5-7 irons.

Modulus
Like torque, modulus (unit stress divided by unit strain) refers to the type of graphite material
used to produce a particular shaft. The higher the modulus, the stiffer the material.
Technology has improved making modulus not a relevant factor.

Moment of inertia (MOI)
"Moment of inertia" is the term applied to a clubhead's resistance to twisting when the ball is struck. For example, your swing is a little off and you hit the ball on the toe of the clubhead.
A clubhead with a higher MOI will twist less as a result of the mishit, creating a better chance that the ball will still go straight (or at least not be affected as greatly by the mishit).
Moment of Intertia is a physical property that can be expressed as a numerical measurement.
That's not a number that is common to see (yet) in golf clubs.
However, the term "moment of inertia" or "MOI" is becoming much more common in advertising and marketing by the golf club companies.
The growth in popularity of term is directly related to the growth in popularity of ever-larger clubheads, both for drivers and putters. The size and weighting properties of a clubhead can be manipulated to add a greater MOI.
High-MOI is an important component in clubs that are described as "forgiving" or "game improvement."

Offset
The distance from the frontmost part of the hosel to the frontmost part of the clubhead.
At address, the shaft of an offset club will appear to be in front of the clubhead. Offset may be found in any club.
Many putters have offset to help the golfer have his or her hands ahead of the ball at impact.
Offset drivers and irons can be helpful to players who slice. See Progressive Offset.

Overall Weight (total weight, static weight, or dead weight)
Total weight of the golf club measured in grams or ounces.

Parallel Unitized Shafts
This is the way most shafts are made today: one constant diameter from the tip to the first step, or for a certain length as on graphite shafts. You can use one shaft for all your irons,
one shaft for all your woods. The difference : cutting certain amounts off the tip of each shaft.

Perimeter Weighting
Distribution of the weight in a clubhead more evenly around the club by moving more weight to the heel, toe and sole. Traditional blades have most of the weight right behind the sweet spot.
Cavity-back clubs are perimeter weighted, which has the effect of enlarging the sweet spot.
Perimeter weighted clubs are more forgiving on off-center hits.

PING Color Code & Chart
PING terminology for the lie angle of a golf club.
There are ten different color codes, each representing a different lie angle.
PING color codes factor in club length, allowing a club fitting specialist to properly fit for lie angle without needing the exact club length/ color code combination on hand.
PING fitters use different color codes to help a golfer achieve a desired ball flight.
Players who tend to fade or slice the ball may benefit from a more upright color code,
while players who tend to draw or hook the ball may benefit from a flatter color code.
PING metal woods also utilize the color code system, and different color codes are available to help reduce or eliminate slices and hooks.

Pistol Grip
A grip, usually on a putter, that is built up under the left or top hand.

Progressive Offset
Progressive offset refers to the amount of offset throughout a set of irons.
In a set of irons with progressive offset, the three iron will have the most offset,
while the PW has the least. Such an iron set may go from 1mm offset on the PW, to 5.9mm on the three iron, that is, the offset "progresses" through the set.

Pull
A ball flight that travels on a straight line, but to the left of the intended target for a right-handed golfer, and to the right for a left-handed golfer.

Push
A ball flight that travels on a straight line, but to the right of the intended target for a right-handed golfer, and to the left for a left-handed golfer.

Roll & Bulge
Metal woods are designed with what are called "roll" and "bulge" on the face.
Looking down on a clubhead, notice there is a curve, or radius, on the face from the toe to the heel.
This is call "bulge". Bulge helps reduce gear effect which is exacerbated because the center of gravity is farther away from the face than on an iron. There is also a curve, or radius, from the top of the face (by the crown) to the bottom of the face (by the sole).
This is called "roll". Too much roll will make the ball go higher on above center hits, and lower on below center hits.

Scoring Clubs
The driver, putter and sand wedge.

Shaft Flex
A rating of a golf club shaft's ability to bend during the golf swing.
All shafts, no matter how stiff, exhibit flex under the forces of the golf swing.
A player with a very fast swing will require a shaft with less flex, while a player with a slower swing will need a shaft with greater flex. Flex is generally rated as Extra Stiff, Stiff, Regular, Senior and Ladies.

Shaft Flex Point / Kick point / Bend point
Flex point, also called kick point or bend point, is the point along a shaft's length at which it exhibits the greatest amount of bend when the tip is pulled down. Ball flight is affected by the location of the kickpoint, although to what extent is a subject of some contention. A general consensus is beginning to emerge that kickpoint has only a very modest effect on ball flight. It has more to do with feel than trajectory.
A high kickpoint may help lower the trajectory of most golfer's shots; a low kickpoint may result in a slightly higher trajectory for most golfers.

Shot Pattern
The distance and directional characteristics of several different shots made with a club, or set of clubs. Usually, players will hit shots that can be categorized by having certain qualities.
ie. a draw or fade, low trajectory or high trajectory.

Short Irons
The 8 and 9 irons and the pitching wedge.
The sand wedge is considered a scoring or specialty club.

Slice
A ball flight with a pronounced left-to-right curve for a right-handed player, or a pronounced right-to-left curve for a left-handed player.

Sole
It is the bottom of a club. When referring to the swing, it is the point when the sole of the club touches the ground at address.

Sole-Weighted
A design, usually for fairway woods, that incorporates additional weight along the sole of the club.
This makes it easier to get the ball into the air and is also effective from the rough.

Spring-Like Effect - Trampoline Effect
As commonly used, the layman's term for "coefficient of restitution."
The two are not the same thing - COR is a measurement, spring-like effect is what is being measured.
A high COR driver face is said to have a "spring-like effect" because of the degree to which the face depresses, then springs back into shape when striking a ball.

Stainless Steel Types: 17-4, 431, 15-5
Differing types of stainless steel are used in club heads, and these types are referred to as 17-4 stainless, 431 stainless, and 15-5 stainless. 17-4 and 15-5 are used for woods and irons, and are "harder" than 431, while 431 is primarily used in irons. While they do have different metallurgical properties, hitting tests have shown no performance difference.
The difference between 17-4, 431, and 15-5 is analogous to the difference between oak and maple, they're both hard woods with subtle differences.

Straight-Faced
The description of a club with very little loft, such as a driving iron, or a driver that lacks the standard bulge and roll.

Sweet Spot
The point on the clubface where, if it is struck with an object, the clubface will not torque or twist to either side.

Swing Plane
The angle of the club during the swing. Generally, shorter players have flatter swing planes,
while taller players have more upright swing planes.
Swing plane can be influenced by the golfer's posture during the swing.
A player with an upright posture will swing the club on a steeper plane than a golfer of the same height who prefers a neutral posture.

Swing weight
Swing Weight has absolutely nothing to do with the weight of a golf club, only how the weight is distributed.
Swingweight is variously defined as "the degree to which the club balances toward the clubhead" or "the ratio of the weight of the head to the grip end of the club"...
It means : swingweight is a measurement that describes how the weight of a club feels when the club is being swing.

This scale compares the ratio of weight at the head end to the weight at the grip end and gives the results in a "letter/number". A 12 pound golf club and a 1 pound golf club can both have a swing weight of D-1 if their weight is distributed the same.
The swing weight scale measurement is in "swing weight points" which is an alphanumeric range of 77 swing weight points, starting at A0, then A1, A2, etc. to A10, then B0, B1, and so on until reaching G10.
A0 would be the "lightest" swing weight, G10 the heaviest.
Most mens clubs are produced to have a swing weight of D0 or D1, which has become the standard, meaning a D0 or D1 swing weight feels not too heavy, or too light (during the swing), but just right for most men.
Women's standard swing weight is about C5 to C7.

Swingweight is mostly used to match clubs in a set.
It is ideal (although not always critical) for clubs within a set to match in swingweight.

Taper Tip Shafts
The tip looks like the end of a pencil. Naturally, the hosel must be the same shape.
For the most part, these have been replaced by parallel tip shafts, except for such hold overs as Ping, Powerbilt, Tommy Armour and a few others.

Tip of Shaft
The tip is the skinny end where the clubhead goes.

Titanium
Titanium has a high strength to weight ratio ... Meaning that titanium clubheads can be larger yet lighter than conventional steel clubheads.

Toe
The area of the clubhead that is farthest from the hosel.

Toe-down Effect
The flexing of the shaft in the downswing due to centrifugal force acting on the clubhead.
The clubhead actually gets lower and closer to the golfer (by 1/4" to 1/2" for most players)
by the time it reaches the impact area.

Torque
A measurement of how much a shaft will twist under a certain load / during a golf swing.
Shafts with more torque generally feel softer since the shaft absorbs more vibration
by flexing more around the axis (centerline) of the shaft.
The trade-off can be less accuracy since the direction the clubface is pointed is directly related
to the tortional load on the shaft at impact.
Generally, shafts with more flex have more torque.
To measure torque, the butt of the shaft is secured and a force is applied to the tip section of the shaft. The number of degrees the shaft twists is its torque rating.
Too much torque can lead to the head turning. Although torque does exist in steel shafts, the term is almost always used in relation to graphite shafts.
It had more value in the early days of graphite shafts which were more like fishing rods.
Today, materials and manufacturing processes have improved such that torque has less meaning.

Total Weight
The weight of the finished golf club, usually measured in grams.

Trajectory
The angle and 'shape' of the flight of the golf ball.
Optimal ball trajectory is usually described as steady and climbing to an apex, then falling off quickly with a small percentage of the total distance being roll.
Ball trajectory that curves upward and/or peaks late in flight (ballooning) and creates less roll, may indicate that the shaft is too flexible.
Ball trajectory that peaks early in flight, curves downward and creates excessive roll may indicate that the shaft is too stiff.

Trampoline Effect
When the thin wall face of an oversize driver deflects inward then outward during impact with the golf ball. This leads to greater energy transfer, higher initial velocity and greater distance.
See Spring-Like Effect.

Tungsten Inserts
Heavy metal inserts, generally in lighter metal (eg titanium) clubheads, for weight distribution purposes.

Upright
A lie angle in which the shaft extends from the hosel at a higher angle than a person of average height and with average arm length.
An upright lie angle might be recommended for taller players and players with high hand positions at impact. Can also be used to describe a club whose 'toe' is higher than the 'heel' when used by a particular golfer.

Vector
A quantity or measure related to force that has both magnitude and direction.
An important factor in determining the distance and direction a ball travels.

Wrist-to-Floor
One of the measurements taken in order to determine fitting specifications,
it is measured from the crease just above the palm of the player's lead arm (the left arm for right-handed players and the right arm for left-handed players) straight to the floor.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Golfer: " This golf is a funny game. "  Caddy: " It's not supposed to be. "

 

 
 

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